• $1,495,000
  • 2 Beds
  • 2 Baths
  • 1,495 SqFt
  • MLS# 486685

Located in prestigious Cow Hollow, this two-level condominium has it all. Main level consists of a spacious living room, dining area, entrance foyer and full bath. The kitchen includes a 5-burner Bosch gas stove, oven and Bosch dishwasher. A wall of sliding glass doors overlooks the deck and beautiful large garden which features a myriad of fruit trees, plants and shrubs. Two bedrooms, a remodeled bathroom and an open office area complete the second floor. The private garage opens directly into the entrance foyer. Union and Chestnut Street restaurants and shopping are a short walk away, as is the Marina, Crissy Field and the Bay. The close by Miley Playground is a wonderful place for children. Don’t miss this rare opportunity to live in the best part of town!

Features

  • Two level
  • 2 bedroom
  • 2 bathroom
  • Private 1-car garage
  • Hardwood floors
  • Deeded deck
  • Deeded storage
  • Shared garden/patio
  • 4-unit building
  • On Muni bus line
  • Cow Hollow location
  • 2 blocks from Presidio
  • 1,495 Square Feet
  • $240/monthly HOA dues
  • Built in 1904

Location

Cross Street:

Baker

City:

San Francisco

County:

San Francisco

Open Houses

Saturday, August 24 2:00pm – 4:00pm

Sunday, August 25 2:00pm – 4:00pm

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Cornelia Y. de Schepper

Broker Associate

DRE# 00966154

415.867.9337

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Interior Features

Exterior Features

Additional Details

Map & Community

About Cow Hollow

The cows came home a long time ago, but the farmland where they once grazed still bears their name. Contemporary Cow Hollow retains some of its original pastoral character, but you can’t call it rural or rustic. It is one of the most handsome and desirable residential neighborhoods in San Francisco, nestled between The Presidio, the Marina district, Pacific Heights and Russian Hill. Once known as Spring Valley, this historic area attracted settlers who came to San Francisco in the wake of the Gold Rush. They set up farms and dairies, using the fresh water from streams and a lagoon. But in 1891, the city banished the cows from what by then was called Cow Hollow—purportedly because the bountiful Bovinae ...

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